• CRISPR/Cas9 Genome Editing

CRISPR/Cas9 Genome Editing

Save Your Time, Money & Effort! Leverage our extensive expertise in CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technologies to generate genetically modified mouse, rat, cancer and stem cell lines, with a variety of modifications in a targeted gene of interest. As one of the earliest licensees of CRISPR/Cas9 technology, we have genetically engineered > 1800 unique cell line and animal models for disease modeling, functional genomics, target identification, antibody validation, and validation for drug discovery and screening, and more. We offer affordable, comprehensive custom service with a fast turnaround time to meet the exact requirement of your projects. You can also combine it with our downstream custom assay services for a seamless project workflow.

CRISPR/Cas9 Genome Editing Categories

Cell Line Models

Custom stable cell line model generation using CRISPR/Cas9 for disease modeling, antibody validation, and drug screening.

Cell Line Models

Mouse Models

Custom CRISPR/Cas9 engineered mouse models with a variety of genetic modifications; generated in our AAALAC-accredited animal facility in the USA.

Mouse Models

Rat Models

Custom CRISPR/Cas9 rat models for disease modeling and drug screening; generated in our AAALAC-accredited animal facility in the USA.

Rat Models

Products and Services
FAQs
What is CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology?
What genome editing method do you use in your Cell Line service?
Is there a size limit on DNA to be inserted into the genome (CRISPR Knock-in)?
Have you encountered difficulties in genome editing in cell lines?
How many guide RNAs do you typically design for a CRISPR Genome Editing Service?
Can you provide off-target analysis report?
Are you currently providing gene editing service to biotech/pharmaceutical companies as well?
Can we have a confidentiality disclosure agreement (CDA) before disclosing my project details?
What is the efficiency of CRISPR-Cas9 technology as compared to TARGATT™ and random transgenesis for mouse model generation?
Which technology is suitable for inserting a gene of interest with GFP or Cre-ERT in a mouse model?
What is the basis of your design algorithm for the sgRNAs?
Technical Details

Genetic modifications available through our CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing platform:
Gene knockout, point mutation knock-in, gene insertion in any locus, including safe harbor locus (large fragment insertion, reporter gene knock-in, gene replacement), conditional knockout/ knock-in models, conditional/ inducible gene expression models.

CRISPR applications:
Functional genomics, disease modeling, target identification and validation for drug discovery and screening, and many more.

Choosing the right genome editing technology:
Applied StemCell uses two complementary genome editing technologiesto generate advanced cell line and animal models very efficiently and effectively: the CRISPR/Cas9 technology and our propriety site-specific gene integration technology, TARGATT™ for large fragment (up to 20 kb) knock-in into a safe harbor locus.

Project Purpose

CRISPR/Cas9

TARGATT™

Knock-Out (KO)

Yes

 

Point Mutation

Yes

 

Conditional KO

Yes

 

Knock-In

(<200 Nucleotide ssODN Donor)

Yes

 

Knock-In Transgenes in

Safe Harbor Loci (>2kb)

Challenging

(but limitations on size)

Yes

 (up to 20kb)

Knock-In

 (Plasmid DNA)

Challenging

(but limitations on size)

Yes

 (2 steps: KI docking site; KI transgene) 

Publications

CRISPR Cell Line Models:  Knockout, Knock-in, Point Mutation

  • Ilic, D. (2019). Latest developments in the field of stem cell research and regenerative medicine compiled from publicly available information and press releases from nonacademic institutions in October 2018. Regenerative medicine, 14(2), 85-92.
  • Simkin, D., Searl, T. J., Piyevsky, B. N., Forrest, M., Williams, L. A., Joshi, V., ... & Penzes, P. (2019). Impaired M-current in KCNQ2 Encephalopathy Evokes Dyshomeostatic Modulation of Excitability. bioRxiv, 538371. https://doi.org/10.1101/538371

Jang, Y., Choi, J., Park, N., Kang, J., Kim, M., Kim, Y., & Ju, J. H. (2019). Development of immunocompatible pluripotent stem cells via CRISPR-based human leukocyte antigen engineering. Experimental & Molecular Medicine, 51(1), 3.
Colomar-Carando, N., Meseguer, A., Jutz, S., Herrera-Fernández, V., Olvera, A., Kiefer, K., ... & Vicente, R. (2018). Zip6 Transporter Is an Essential Component of the Lymphocyte Activation Machinery. The Journal of Immunology, ji1800689.

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Tanic, J. (2018). A Role for Adseverin in the Invasion and Migration of MCF7 Breast Adenocarcinoma Cells (Doctoral dissertation).

  • Lizarraga, S. B., Maguire, A. M., Ma, L., van Dyck, L. I., Wu, Q., Nagda, D., ... & Cowen, M. H. (2018). Human neurons from Christianson syndrome iPSCs reveal allele-specific responses to rescue strategies. bioRxiv, 444232.
  • Tanaka, H., Kondo, K., Chen, X., Homma, H., Tagawa, K., Kerever, A., ... & Fujita, K. (2018). The intellectual disability gene PQBP1 rescues Alzheimer’s disease pathology. Molecular Psychiatry, 1.
  • Yin, Y., Garcia, M. R., Novak, A. J., Saunders, A. M., Ank, R. S., Nam, A. S., & Fisher, L. W. (2018). Surf4 (Erv29p) binds amino-terminal tripeptide motifs of soluble cargo proteins with different affinities, enabling prioritization of their exit from the endoplasmic reticulum. PLoS biology, 16(8), e2005140.
  • Selvan, N., George, S., Serajee, F. J., Shaw, M., Hobson, L., Kalscheuer, V. M., ... & Schwartz, C. E. (2018). O-GlcNAc transferase missense mutations linked to X-linked intellectual disability deregulate genes involved in cell fate determination and signaling. Journal of Biological Chemistry, jbc-RA118.
  • Smalley, E. (2018). FDA warns public of dangers of DIY gene therapy. https://doi.org/10.1038/nbt0218-119

  • Chai, S., Wan, X., Ramirez-Navarro, A., Tesar, P. J., Kaufman, E. S., Ficker, E., ... & Deschênes, I. (2018). Physiological genomics identifies genetic modifiers of long QT syndrome type 2 severity. The Journal of clinical investigation, 128(3).

  • Boi, S., Ferrell, M. E., Zhao, M., Hasenkrug, K. J., & Evans, L. H. (2018). Mouse APOBEC3 expression in NIH 3T3 cells mediates hypermutation of AKV murine leukemia virus. Virology, 518, 377-384. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.virol.2018.03.014.

  • Molinski, S. V., et al. (2017). Orkambi® and amplifier co‐therapy improves function from a rare CFTR mutation in gene‐edited cells and patient tissue. EMBO Molecular Medicine, e201607137.

  • Petrovic, P. B. (2017). Myosin Phosphatase Rho-interacting Protein Regulates DDR1-mediated Collagen Tractional Remodeling (Doctoral dissertation, University of Toronto (Canada)).

  • Peng, L., Zhang, H., Hao, Y., Xu, F., Yang, J., Zhang, R., ... & Chen, C. (2016). Reprogramming macrophage orientation by microRNA 146b targeting transcription factor IRF5. EBioMedicine, 14, 83-96.

  • Hu, J. K., Crampton, J. C., Locci, M., & Crotty, S. (2016). CRISPR-mediated Slamf1Δ/Δ Slamf5Δ/Δ Slamf6Δ/Δ triple gene disruption reveals NKT cell defects but not T follicular helper cell defects. PloS one, 11(5), e0156074.

  • Smalley, E. (2016). CRISPR mouse model boom, rat model renaissance. Nature Biotechnology. 34, 893–894.

  • Baker, M. (2014). Gene editing at CRISPR speed. Nature biotechnology, 32(4), 309-313.

CRISPR Mouse/ Rat Models:  Knock-in, Knockout, and Conditional Knockout 

CRISPR Technology

CRISPR Knock-in H11 Locus in Pigs

  • Ruan, J., Li, H., Xu, K., Wu, T., Wei, J., Zhou, R., ... & Chen-Tsai, R. Y. (2015). Highly efficient CRISPR/Cas9-mediated transgene knockin at the H11 locus in pigs. Scientific reports, 5, 14253.

Knock-in, Knockout, Conditional Knock-out

  • Deng, F., He, S., Cui, S., Shi, Y., Tan, Y., Li, Z., ... & Peng, L. (2018). A Molecular Targeted Immunotherapeutic Strategy for Ulcerative Colitis via Dual-Targeting Nanoparticles Delivering miR-146b to Intestinal Macrophages. Journal of Crohn's and Colitis.
  • Jo, S., Fonseca, T. L., Bocco, B. M. D. C., Fernandes, G. W., McAninch, E. A., Bolin, A. P., ... & Németh, D. (2018). Type 2 deiodinase polymorphism causes ER stress and hypothyroidism in the brain. The Journal of Clinical Investigation.
  • Langston, R. G., Rudenko, I. N., Kumaran, R., Hauser, D. N., Kaganovich, A., Ponce, L. B., ... & Beilina, A. (2018). Differences in Stability, Activity and Mutation Effects Between Human and Mouse Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2. Neurochemical research, 1-14.
  • Amara, N., Tholen, M., & Bogyo, M. (2018). Chemical tools for selective activity profiling of endogenously expressed MMP-14 in multicellular models. ACS Chemical Biology. doi: 10.1021/acschembio.8b00562.
  • Allocca, S., Ciano, M., Ciardulli, M. C., D’Ambrosio, C., Scaloni, A., Sarnataro, D., ... & Bonatti, S. (2018). An αB-Crystallin Peptide Rescues Compartmentalization and Trafficking Response to Cu Overload of ATP7B-H1069Q, the Most Frequent Cause of Wilson Disease in the Caucasian Population. International journal of molecular sciences, 19(7).
  • *Peng, L., Zhang, H., Hao, Y., Xu, F., Yang, J., Zhang, R., ... & Chen, C. (2016). Reprogramming macrophage orientation by microRNA 146b targeting transcription factor IRF5. EBioMedicine, 14, 83-96.

  • *Hu, J. K., Crampton, J. C., Locci, M., & Crotty, S. (2016). CRISPR-mediated Slamf1Δ/Δ Slamf5Δ/Δ Slamf6Δ/Δ triple gene disruption reveals NKT cell defects but not T follicular helper cell defects. PloS one, 11(5), e0156074.

  • *Besschetnova, T. Y., Ichimura, T., Katebi, N., Croix, B. S., Bonventre, J. V., & Olsen, B. R. (2015). Regulatory mechanisms of anthrax toxin receptor 1-dependent vascular and connective tissue homeostasis. Matrix Biology, 42, 56-73.

  • *McKenzie, C. W., Craige, B., Kroeger, T. V., Finn, R., Wyatt, T. A., Sisson, J. H., ... & Lee, L. (2015). CFAP54 is required for proper ciliary motility and assembly of the central pair apparatus in mice. Molecular biology of the cell, 26(18), 3140-3149.

  • *Bishop, K. A., Harrington, A., Kouranova, E., Weinstein, E. J., Rosen, C. J., Cui, X., & Liaw, L. (2016). CRISPR/Cas9-mediated insertion of loxP sites in the mouse Dock7 gene provides an effective alternative to use of targeted embryonic stem cells. G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics, 6(7), 2051-2061.

Mouse/ Rat Models: Homologous Recombination Conditional Knockout Mouse 

  • Li, C., Zheng, Z., Ha, P., Chen, X., Jiang, W., Sun, S., ... & Chen, E. C. (2018). Neurexin Superfamily Cell Membrane Receptor Contactin‐Associated Protein Like‐4 (Cntnap4) is Involved in Neural EGFL Like 1 (Nell‐1)‐responsive Osteogenesis. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research https://doi.org/10.1002/jbmr.3524.

  • Geraets, R. D., Langin, L. M., Cain, J. T., Parker, C. M., Beraldi, R., Kovacs, A. D., ... & Pearce, D. A. (2017). A tailored mouse model of CLN2 disease: A nonsense mutant for testing personalized therapies. PloS one, 12(5), e0176526.

  • Miller, J. N., Kovács, A. D., & Pearce, D. A. (2015). The novel Cln1R151Xmouse model of infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL) for testing nonsense suppression therapy. Human Molecular Genetics, 24(1), 185–196. http://doi.org/10.1093/hmg/ddu428.

Have Questions?

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